Thursday, June 13, 2013

On Carp and Car Sickness

Runoff is in full swing here on Colorado’s Front Range. Like an old woman, the mountains slowly lose their white until only wisps are left straggling down. Winter’s tendrils grasping in cirques and north faces long into July.

Sometimes…they never leave.

Snowpack now makes small streams whitewater roar and reservoirs slowly fill back up again, after last year’s dismal low. The pounding snows of May came through at the end, like any good play in a game -- winter’s trump upon trump. Complete with cheering on my part. And any angler who did not, should have their license revoked, that’s what I say.   

The benefit of being a multi-species angler is evident at this time of year: I can still find good fishing. Water levels on the mudflats are higher and murkier than they have been -- and the buoy line on the best of the beaches has been placed, holding through the summer season to protect shoreline bird breeding habitat. But there are carp – and white bass, crappie, and smallmouth bass – cruising and willing (with enough convincing -- like fathers and borrowing the car when you're 16), to take a fly. 


While tailwater anglers must deal with each other and city-pond-fishers the homeless…reservoir carpers combat pelicans, bloated prairie dogs, and protective large-homed old women yelling out their windows should you get too close.

We waded far and deep, Jay, Ivan and I -- long rounds that would leave us all dehydrated and seeing phantoms – like walking through woods as night falls, with an active imagination. You can see almost anything. But that comes with the territory, I guess: moving water and blinding sun. Focusing on a single point while the world moves around you, keeps you steady. That’s why driving if you get carsick works.

So now, you just have to focus on the task at hand – that large shadow swiftly moving away – and catch up.

23 comments:

  1. "The pounding snows of May came through at the end, like any good play in a game -- winter’s trump upon trump. Complete with cheering on my part." I was nodding my head in agreement while thinking how perfectly you wrote this part. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks for the good words, David...and for reading!

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    1. John - It was a great day! Thanks.

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  3. Thanks to you my persistent friend...I'm trying as hard as I can. Next year I'll cheer the snow as well.

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    1. You had better, Howard. You had better. ;-) Thanks as always for reading.

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  4. Great to see you back, Erin.

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    1. Lots going on, but I'm still here! Thanks, Mr. P!

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  5. Welcome back Canyon Lady, you've been missed :o)

    I'd love to hear more about the shouting old woman.

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    1. Hi Dave! Well...let's just say it was the first time I've ever had the police called on me. An officer came out just to pacify the Old Bird, and check out licenses. But all was well in the end.

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    2. A brush with the law eh? Always suspected you had a dark side :o)

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  6. I've not carped yet, at least not in the angling sense, but I can see the appeal when the options are few though I think you may have danced with this demon once too many times to call it a highwater affair. I sense a carper....

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    1. Steve - Perceptive you are! Thanks for stopping by...

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  7. Great Erin!

    Something tells me the backstabber was put to good use. Wonderful pictures, (and in Kirk Deeter's new book of you and carp).

    Gregg

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    1. Gregg - That indeed it was. And thanks...on both accounts! Cheers, - E

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  8. Nice day and nice caught.
    Contratulations
    David
    www.romanillosflyfishing.com

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    1. David - Thanks for stopping by to read.

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  9. Carp on the fly, something else i would like too get around too along with catching pike on the fly.

    I finished your book a while ago and i thoroughly enjoyed it for the first page too the last.

    Lovely too be reading your blog again, keep up the great writting.

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    1. Tom - Both species are at the top of my list as favorites...and both quite a challenge but worth the effort. Thanks for the good words, and as always, for reading.

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  10. Erin, this comment has zip to do with this posting. It has to do with the pleasant surprise that came with my morning breakfast tea. Flipping through the Summer "Trout" magazine I was introduced to John Land LeCoq. Such an insightful interview. The idea of a conservation capitalists, if you will, really clicked while reading your piece (as well as seeing the review of Ted Turner's book within the magazine).

    His quote...."people want to listen to someone who has a story" hit me like a ton of bricks. People not only want to listen to, but support those stories. I guess that's why so many here feel a connection to your writing. Perhaps that's why I'll pay too much for a Patagonia or Simms, and now Fishpond product. So great to run across your name and words in print more frequently. So good to have examples like yourself for my own daughter. Keep it up.

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    1. M.A. - Great to have you stop by! I just received my copy in the mail this evening, and saw the official spread for the first time. LeCoq was an absolute pleasure to talk with, and an inspiring individual, no doubt...who spreads that to the many things he's passionate about and involved with. We're lucky one of those things is fly fishing! And I completely agree with you -- I'm happy to pay more for a product whose story I know and connect with. Thanks for the good words and always reading, wherever the words pop up. I'll try to keep up good-example-status...your daughter is lucky to have you as a dad, that I know. Hope you're all settling in and enjoying the new place!

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